Fashion – History’s Bread Trail

Just as the rings of a tree tell its age, fashion acts as that ring. Immediately seeing a particular style of fashion, you can, with most certainty, tell its age. Clothing has the ability to be an excellent indicator of time. When you turn on an episode of say, COPS, by examining the clothing and hairstyles you can almost immediately decipher the decade. The same can be said for when one is watching say a movie preview, is it a period piece? What era? All you need to do is look at the clothing and think back to your middle-school history class. Let us not forget to mention what intense and indelible effect clothing has on culture and society. The first thing we see has a tendency to say a lot about who we are as people, as well as a society as a whole. In the beginning clothing was about protection and heat regulation. There are so many theories as to why homo-sapiens (man) began to loose the hair covering their bodies. Perhaps no one wanted lice living on them and eating them alive. Whatever the reason, the shift has shaped culture, questioning what may be acceptable and challenging that which is not acceptable, in addition to its primary purpose of shelter for the body.

Marie Antoinette, a woman famous for her fashion sense and ability to create trends, indulged her passion for fashion. While prominent heads of state lived off the yearly wage of 50,000 livres, Antoinette spend double that, around 100,000 livres on her wardrobe alone every year. Although well known for her high style, she kept some of her more extravagant spending a secret from the King. Antoinette not only set trends and presented new ways to express oneself through fashion it may have been a secondary function to her spending. Antoinette was unable to bear children, frustrated and childless, she kept tails waging with her wild wigs and costuming, diverting attention from the fact that she could not produce an heir.

The period of 1911 to around 1925 saw a lot of change in the way of women’s rights as well as women’s hemlines. The social upheaval that occurred as a result of World War I created a shift in the economy, which also created a shift in society’s role for women. As men went off to war, women were left behind to rear the children, tend the home, and now more than ever bring home the bacon. After the war, the Age of Jazz was ushered in, an era when prohibition looms large and styles changed dramatically, creating quite the controversy in the streets. In 1910 the hemlines were ankle-length; in 1919 they hiked up to the mid-calf and finally by 1925 hemlines were all the way up to the knee. In the span of 15 years, men and women were exposed to more feminine flesh than previously experienced in history. As women fought for their rights, they also questioned what society told them to wear and how to dress. If they had to take on both role of mother and father, they had better wear whatever makes them feel good.

Since its conception, the movie industry wanted to uphold the values and morals of the time. In 1922 the industry created the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA), headed by the former postmaster Will H. Hays. Later nicknamed the “Hays Office,” was all about upholding the standards of society, which decent people valued, e.g., regulating what was acceptable to be seen in regards to violence, sex, hemlines and necklines. For a while it was a great self-governing system solution for the motion picture industry, though in the 1940s with WWII, saw a weakening in its governing strength. Independent movie producers like Howard Hughes created films such as “The Outlaw,” a 1943 western, starring Jane Russell that chipped away at the compliance of the board. Considered too sexual and provocative, Hughes cut many scenes, raised necklines, and later was granted a seal approval from the “Hayes Office,” but disgruntled by all the editing, Hughes shelved the project until 1946. In 1946 Hughes, in a strong act of defiance, released his film without any edits and experienced widespread mainstream success despite the board’s obvious disapproval. Finally, in the 1950s the board was disbanded and the ratings system we now have in place started to come to fruition.

During and after the sexual revolution, society saw severe shifts in the styles seen in the streets. Though in the beginning of the 1960s only the hippies were wearing and doing radical practices. As the decade went on, it was more about a self-made expression of social defiance. Hippies wore less clothing, louder styles and even created garments of their own design as an answer to war, hate, ignorance and the values of regimented society. The clothing embraced by the hippie community reflected influences of eastern philosophy, psychedelic rock music, drug experimentation and all other forms of alternative consciousness. It shocked suburbia and shifted the acceptable standards of dress, no longer would women have to leave the house with set hair, a full face of makeup, gloves a coat and of course a hat. After the 1960s women and men have enjoyed much more freedom of expression in personal style. Maybe we were all just happy that some people put their clothes back on, no matter what those clothes might be.

The 1990s were another decade enjoying a new sense of identity, courtesy of the fashion world. Widespread economic productivity, a new way to communicate via the internet and a clear shift in gender roles in industrialized countries worldwide all lent to fashion’s mainstream appeal. Instead of actors and actresses on our magazine covers, it was the faces of Cindy Crawford, Linda Evangelista, Claudia Schiffer, Stephanie Seymour, Naomi Campbell, and Christy Turlington. High fashion’s heavy influence during this decade was certainly a bi-product of increased economic productivity. We started to watch runway shows on cable every Saturday morning, we wanted models in our gossip mags, and we defiantly needed their wardrobes. These big supermodels crossed all mainstream borders, appearing on the runways, as contract faces for the major labels, on TV and even in film. If not for these major crossovers, where would we be today? We would be without our Cameron Diaz’ and Charlize Theron’, both former models who have crossed the lines and influenced what we want to emulate in fashion.

Fashion is a force to follow, fueling the frenzy of civilization, questioning standards and crossing borders, acting as a permanent marker of what culture values and considers new or acceptable, feeding our dreams, fantasies, fears, and beliefs, and creating a piece of time to teach and test the ages.

Wigs – Making Fashion History

Wigs have been in fashion for thousands of years. From as far back as ancient Egypt, to as recent as the Jessica Simpson wig and hair piece line, wigs have been popular. They are used to disguise the loss of hair and to better the appearance. In the 16th century it was more common to wear a wig than to wear one’s own natural hair.

Royalty throughout the ages have worn wigs and hair pieces as a symbol of wealth and power.

Actors and actresses have worn wigs for hundreds, even thousands of years to help in their costumes and in ‘setting the stage.’

In more recent years, actresses such as Raquel Welch have popularized the fashion of wigs in America by creating their own line of products.

Wigs are now worn for many different reasons such as convenience. A wig can be styled ahead of time and does not take as long to style.

Wigs are also commonly worn by those suffering from a medical condition such at cancer but they are also worn by individuals who have had genetic hair loss because they are more affordable than hair replacement systems. The American Hair Loss Association says that about 40% of their cases are women; (this includes about 90 million women) and over 50% of these women’s hair loss is genetic.

In modern times wigs are also being worn for style’s sake. With a wig or a collection of wigs, a person has the choice of wearing a different style everyday and they can choose between colors, lengths and style, (curly, wave or straight).

Turtlenecks Steeped in Fashion History

Turtleneck Origins and Acceptance

The popular turtleneck of today came about as a necessity rather than a fashion option. During the turn of the century, seamen and deckhands were in need of a clothing accessory that could protect their neck from the bitterly cold winds. A scarf was impractically dangerous, exhibiting the potential for snagging on deck hardware or being caught up the rigging. This prompted the invention of the first polo-neck sweater, which was a collar extension for the neck. The first material was comprised of heavy worsted wool. The first collars were fitted with buttons, and then later replaced with zippers. Zippers and buttons were excluded some time later with the invention of more lasting and stretchable fabrics that allowed a permanent attachment. The general public began to take notice and accept the turtleneck as popular wearing apparel, taking advantage of the many colors and styles

The 1940s saw the turtleneck sweater adopted by the female audience, who found favor with some of the more elegant materials like cashmere and silk. The ’60s brought about a more frenzied interest in the turtleneck when many of the rock musicians began wearing them. Noel Coward, respected for his artistry and station, began wearing turtlenecks for all occasions and the public took immediate attention. He was, after all, known as a walking fashion statement, regarded for his flamboyance, pose, poise, chic and cheek. A groundswell followed, cementing the turtleneck in the concrete foundation of fashion and style.

It seemed every clothing manufacturer wanted a piece of the pie. Some of the old stylistic trends came back into vogue-zipper or no zipper, with or without buttons and the inclusion of pleated designs. Some turtlenecks were loose fitting, having shallow or large fold-down collars. Business men began to wear them under suit jackets and sports coats, and they were popularized by such luminaries as Ted Kennedy and Steve Jobs of Apple Inc.

Today, the turtleneck has shown resurgence, reminding us of an era that spawned bold, new looks. It’s as practical and classy as ever, harkening to a time of fond memories. It’s here to stay, fondly engrained in our consciousness.

Love them or hate, turtlenecks are here to stay and are recapturing popularity in the fashion trends of today. They appeal to men and women of all ages, whether they’re used for formal or leisure attire. They are applicable to a wide range of outfits, styles and themes. Smart and classy looking, turtlenecks also serve the practical function of keeping the neck area warm and cozy, negating the need for a scarf. They blend well with sports activities like golf or venues that require just a little bit more warmth for the occasion. The short sleeve turtleneck allows easy summertime wearing, but still retains that classic look. The history and application of the turtleneck is short, but interesting.